giraffe wear

October 6, 2014 at 7:51 pm | Posted in ideas | Leave a comment
Tags: , , ,

Fashion trend! I have been noticing a lot of giraffe-themed accessories on ravelry lately. I tend to notice giraffe things because my brother in law really likes giraffes, and I am always on the lookout for gift ideas for family members. It does seem like there are quite a lot of giraffe knitting projects, so I guess he is not the only one who loves them. Dress yourself in Giraffe Wear!

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/giraffe-cowl-and-mittens

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/giraffe-mittens-sjiraffvotter

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/spotted-giraffe-cowl

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/twiga-or-i-wish-i-were-a-giraffe

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/p0405-giraffe-wrist-warmers-

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/giraffe-cowl, http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/giraffe-mitts, http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/giraffe-beanie (these three are a matched set)

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/orange-giraffe-sock-knitting-instruction-size-38-39

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/giraffes-browsing-in-the-savannah-jacket

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/giraffe-minidress

Advertisements

OMG baby goat sweaters!

October 2, 2014 at 10:02 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
Tags: ,

The cuteness: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/goat-kid-sweater

More Critters

September 13, 2014 at 12:04 am | Posted in gifts, projects | Leave a comment
Tags: ,

After I made the rat and the bear, I made a hippo, a different bear, a turtle, a beetle, and two hedgehogs. Knitting animals is super fun! All of the animals are now living with my nephew, except one of the hedgehogs, which I gave to my aunt. Unfortunately, I forgot to take a picture of the second hedgehog, but maybe my sister can get a picture of my nephew playing with it.

Next I am going to make this cat: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/the-nursery-cat, probably to send to my grandmother.

But right now I am taking a break from animals to work on a few shawls, plus a special project for a wedding present.

Here is a shawl that I finished while I was on vacation a few weeks ago, and I just wore it for the first time today because it was perfect weather for a fashionable cotton neck-wrap! I totally love how this turned out, and I look forward to wearing it frequently.

knittings 015

It was made from this pattern, with a few minor modifications. The yarn is reclaimed from a thrift store sweater that I dyed purple before unraveling.

critters

July 21, 2014 at 6:50 pm | Posted in projects | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , ,

I have found a new obsession for the summer of 2014. Knitted animals!

I made a bear:

And I made a rat:

And now I am working on a hippo, with plans to make another bear from a different pattern, and maybe another rat from this same pattern, and I also found some interesting-looking patterns for sea creatures–a leafy sea dragon and a prawn. And also a dragonfly. And a toad. And….

There is so much knitting to be done and so little time!

today’s challenge

June 2, 2014 at 11:00 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , ,

Question: Can I take a men’s sweater and alter it to fit me better? I do sometimes buy men’s sweaters specifically to have something big and shapeless and cozy to wear. But today I found this sweater at the salvation army and it just won’t work for me unless I make some changes. I love the colors, but the neck is too stiff and tight, and the torso is way too long. It fits, but is neither comfortable or flattering.

20140602_163320

Plan of action: First remove ribbed collar and re-knit to be looser, probably in a cowl style. Next, remove ribbed part at the bottom of the sweater, and maybe also the blue stripe above it. Maybe do the same to sleeves?

Stay tuned to see the finished result!

And if I don’t like how it turns out, I’ll just unravel the entire thing and re-use the yarn.

update on Mrs. Bale

May 3, 2014 at 9:17 am | Posted in projects, sewing | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , ,

After an extensive search of the Ravelry pattern database, I found two scarf patterns that I like and that I think are similar to the lace of Mrs. Bale’s sweater. So I am making one of each!

Mrs. Bale #1 is from this pattern (with a few modifications): http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/best-friend-scarf. I am using some bright golden yellow linen thread that I got for Christmas.

knittin and sewin 015

Mrs. Bale #2 is from this pattern: http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/manchester-scarf. I am knitting it with a collection of wool scraps that I had been saving to dye, but S saw them together and said she liked the colors, so I said I would make her a big fat scarf for next winter.

 

knittin and sewin 011

The second pattern is shaping up to be a little more similar to the inspiring sweater, but I am happy with both of them and I can’t wait to see them when they’re all finished and blocked.

Also here are some gratuitous pictures of two zipper pouches I made recently. The lawnmower one I made for my dad’s birthday and the triangular one is completely pointless. I just wanted to use that fabric and zipper, but I didn’t plan ahead before I started sewing it, so it turned out rather imperfect. And also, what do you put into a triangular pouch?

knittin and sewin 001knittin and sewin 004knittin and sewin 002

knittin and sewin 006knittin and sewin 005

How to make a scrapghan

April 28, 2014 at 8:43 pm | Posted in blogging, pattern | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

ZIGZAG

Someone commented on one of my older blog posts and asked me for a pattern for the creation of scrapghans. I can’t really write down the pattern I use, because there isn’t one. But I can write out a sort of recipe so you can see my process. So here goes…

RECIPE FOR A SCRAP YARN BLANKET:

Ingredients— Lots and lots and lots of yarn scraps. If you’ve ever knit or crocheted a blanket, you know it takes a lot of yarn. Since a scrap blanket is made from small lengths of yarn, be prepared to collect a lot of them.

My single criteria for a piece of yarn is that it is long enough to tie a knot on either end of it to connect it to the rest of the yarn. You might choose to be a little more selective than this if you don’t like tying lots of knots. The larger the piece of yarn, the longer stripe it will make. A “scrap” could be anything from a few inches to half a skein or even more.

Potential sources for scrap yarns include: leftover pieces from your other projects, ribbons and strips of fabric, friends and family members (I have trained mine to save their leftover bits for me), thrift stores (people often donate their leftover yarn), etsy (sellers will sometimes put up a “destash” listing of unwanted yarns), unraveled sweaters (gather the small connecting pieces for your scrap ball while you are deconstructing the body of the sweater for other uses), etc.

Note on fiber contents: I will combine any type of fiber into my scrapghans because I love to have as much assortment as possible. However, different fibers do have different washing instructions. If you want a machine-washable blanket and don’t want parts of it to get felted, then you might choose to avoid wool and other animal fibers.

Optional ingredient: A large amount of one or two other yarns. In some of my blankets, I have worked with one strand of a single color held together with one or two strands of scrap yarn. This will give your blanket a more unified look. For instance, this one has the same gray cotton throughout the blanket, worked together with a restricted palette of scrap yarns. You can see it looks very different from the scrapghan at the beginning of this post, which is only scrap yarns.

oct 2011 078

Step One: Organizing your yarn

Once you have collected your scrap yarns, you need to decide whether you want to arrange the colors at all, or whether you prefer complete randomness. Obviously there are lots of different options for designing your blanket, so think about how you would like it to look as a finished product.

If you want wide stripes, you would group like-colored yarns together. Here is an example where I did that. For this blanket I made a separate bag of scraps for each color, then blended them together as I went along.

sister

To have a more random assortment of colors, my usual procedure is to start knitting or crocheting the blanket when I only have a little bit of yarn, and then I just attach new scraps as I acquire them until the blanket is as big as I want it.

You could also collect all your yarns first, then draw randomly from the bag each time you need a new color, or you could wind them all into large balls of scraps. The large balls are fun because you forget what’s inside so you don’t know what’s going to come next as you’re knitting along, but they can also be a little unwieldy.

You can also restrict your color assortment, as in the gray blanket above. It will take longer to collect the yarn if you are drawing from fewer colors, of course. But you might choose to do this to make a blanket that matches a room’s color scheme, or as a gift for someone in their favorite color, etc.

Step Two–Creation

A scrap blanket can be made with any standard blanket pattern, but simpler is better. A complex pattern won’t show up well against the backdrop of color changes, and more complicated stitches might be hard to do with the thicker lengths of yarn. I usually do either garter stitch or single crochet. I have also done a few giant granny squares, one wide-ribbed knit, and my current project is the zigzag blanket in the picture at the top. When choosing between knit or crochet, keep in mind that knitted fabric uses less yarn and is stretchier and thinner, while crocheted fabric works up faster, uses more yarn, and is thicker and sturdier. Both make excellent finished products.

I always work with at least two strands held together because this helps to unify the varying weights of the yarns. You will need a large sized crochet hook (I am using a K on my current blanket, and I could easily go up a size or two), or for knitting you will need a large circular needle with enough length to hold lots of stitches.

Since you are going to have a lot of knots, I find it easiest to just leave the ends sticking out, and I like the way it looks as well. If you don’t like the knot ends, you may choose to join your yarn differently, or to fold them in as you go along.

I would recommend starting with a throw-sized blanket for your first scrapghan so you can get a sense of what you like before moving on to a bigger project, and so you can be finished faster! Really, the most difficult thing about making these is the time commitment, because it does take a while to collect and organize all those little pieces of yarn. It actually amazes me to think of how many scrap blankets I have made since I started them!

Finishing touches

Since a scrap blanket is, by nature, a jumble of many different yarns and colors, you might like to add a crochet border in a contrasting color around the edge to pull everything together. I think this looks nice and makes the blanket feel more finished, and it also helps to give a little more structure to knitted blankets. Here is one of my crocheted blankets with an added border of blue and black:

yarn 171

And I think that’s everything! These blankets are a lot of fun to make, and I love to think of other people putting their own spin on the idea. I’ve loved every picture I have seen of other crafters’ creations of scrap yarn blankets. In fact, I think it was a picture on another blog that inspired me to make my very first one, several years ago. So, I hope this write-up is helpful to anyone who was thinking of trying one, and I am happy to answer any questions in case I missed anything here.

Mrs. Bale

April 6, 2014 at 12:29 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , ,

hqdefault

Sallie and I were watching “As Time Goes By” last night, and we both rather liked the sweater that Mrs. Bale was wearing in one of the episodes. So now I am browsing on ravelry, trying to find a similar lace pattern so I can make a Mrs. Bale scarf or shawl. It’s probably too much to ask to find the actual sweater pattern.

some sewing

March 25, 2014 at 1:01 am | Posted in sewing | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , ,

In our current housing situation, my sewing machine unfortunately doesn’t have a permanent home except inside its own storage case. When we have our own house, maybe I can have a sewing room? But for now I have to make do with dragging it out of the closet when I want to sew. So I haven’t been doing much sewing lately.

That’s ok, really. This blog post wasn’t meant to be just a bunch of complaining. If I’m not doing one kind of craft project, that just means that I’m doing a different craft instead, and I’m happy either way.

But what I meant to say was that some of the sewing I did last night was very delayed. These were actually supposed to be a christmas present for S:

sewing 001 sewing 002

It’s a flaxseed-lavender eye pillow with two removable covers made from cotton/silk blend fabric in this lovely jellyfish print: http://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1274734

I picked out the jellyfish fabric with this project in mind because they’re both peaceful and also a little surreal and dream-like. Also I think some of these are called moon jellies.

So, this was a bit late for a christmas present, but she really liked them! I actually made two other flax pillows last night, too, but I didn’t take pictures of the other two. One was a cotton knit with a scattered petal print, the other was a fabric that’s been in my stash for a while with a blue and brown pattern and a very nice drapey-silky feel to the fabric.

S likes to sleep with an eye pillow every night, so I make these semi-regularly. They tend to get lost under the bed or lose their scent over time or get discolored from being used a lot. I am trying something new with the removable pillowcases, but it seemed like a good idea to be able to take the covers off and wash them.

And then I also made a pillowcase for a throw pillow!

sewing 003

The case that came with this pillow was just terrible. It looked great in the store when we bought it, of course, but then it deteriorated and has been looking very bad for quite a while. It was really really satisfying to throw it away and make a new cover! I picked the pink plaid simply for the practical reason that it has built-in lines so it was easy to measure and cut it without having much space to spread out the fabric. The center panel is this fabric from my spoonflower collection: http://www.spoonflower.com/fabric/1770882, which I used as sort of a cheater-quilt block, sewing down all the lines around the squares. Then I added a freeform ruffled border with some pretty flowers to tie it all together. I think it turned out rather cute and I am so very glad to have this pillow looking respectable again.

I still have a big chunk of the plaid left. Maybe I will make a matching cover for our other throw pillow.

Whales

March 20, 2014 at 11:51 pm | Posted in art | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , ,

I have a tattoo of a whale on my lower back.

So naturally I was interested when I learned that one of the upcoming spoonflower design contests is a whale theme.

I drew some pink whales. And played around with some abstract photos of soap bubbles.

And this: pano

Plus this: 002

Plus some fiddling with the spoonflower color editor (because the contest included a restriction to a specific palette of five colors)

Became this: 2962417_rrrrpano_ed

I think they’re cute. 🙂 I have no delusions of winning the contest in competition with professional graphic designers with access to photoshop, etc. But I like to enter the spoonflower design contests because it’s a spur to creative exercise. I wouldn’t have spent part of my day off drawing pink whales otherwise and I rather enjoyed myself.

Here’s the link to the fabric page: http://www.spoonflower.com/designs/2962417

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.