Entomology

February 1, 2008 at 2:32 am | Posted in ideas | 2 Comments
Tags: , ,

black_cricket_P1000732

Originally uploaded by AbrahamLincoln

After writing my last blog post I’ve had a burning desire to make a little knit or crocheted cricket, but I haven’t been able to find a pattern, so I’ve decided to attempt to design my own. And I’m going to try to write down what I do so that other people who crave crocheted crickets in the future can make one too. If it turns out well, that is.

I haven’t, alas, got my own pet cricket to use as a model, so I found this photo on Flickr. It’s by Flickr user “AbrahamLincoln,” which is rather interesting, don’t you think? It makes my imagination seek for connections between household insects and historical presidents. I haven’t found the connection yet, but I’m sure it’s out there.

Also, I went to http://www.dictionary.com to make sure that I was spelling “entomology” correctly, and I found this little tidbit of information from the American Heritage Science Dictionary:

“Our Living Language : Scientists who study insects (there are close to a million that can be studied!) are called entomologists. Why are they not called “insectologists”? Well, in a way they are. The word insect comes from the Latin word insectum, meaning “cut up or divided into segments.” (The plural of insectum, namely insecta, is used by scientists as the name of the taxonomic class that insects belong to.) This Latin word was created in order to translate the Greek word for “insect,” which is entomon. This Greek word also literally means “cut up or divided into segments,” and it is the source of the word entomology. The Greeks had coined this term for insects because of the clear division of insect bodies into three segments, now called the head, thorax, and abdomen.”

So, perhaps the best way to construct my little cricket will be to make it in segments. You can see the segments pretty well in the picture. Thank you, American Heritage and Abraham Lincoln!

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2 Comments »

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  1. good luck!

  2. Thanks!


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